Trifork Blog

Category ‘Custom Development’

Personalised city trip itinerary using integer linear programming

February 1st, 2016 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2016/02/01/personalised-city-trip-itinerary-using-integer-linear-programming/)

Case

As a research project I have developed an itinerary service. The idea started when I was doing a hackathon with colleagues for the city of Amsterdam (see earlier post). I wanted to recommend an itinerary to a tourist visiting the city of Amsterdam. Furthermore, I wanted to make the itinerary based on the user’s interests to recommend interesting places and activities for him in the city. If the user is interested in modern art for example, the recommendation scores for modern art museums will increase for that user.

The tool divides the duration of the tourist’s stay into separate time slots. For example, a single day could be divided in 3 time slots: morning, afternoon, evening. POIs get a different recommendation score for each time slot they can be visited. The Vondelpark for example could be less recommended on Monday morning because of expected rain or because of expected crowds. On Tuesday morning the Vondelpark could be recommended because of an interesting event or nice weather.

The itinerary tool will try to limit travel time between the recommended POIs (point of interests). In this way the tourist will not waste time on travailing. The user can also set a budget for the entire itinerary.

By taking all these considerations into account the tool should be able to aid the user in making good decisions about which places to visit and when to visit them.

Here is a screenshot of the user interface of the itinerary tool that was created as part of the research project:

image01

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Program Release Party for GOTO Amsterdam on January 21

January 12th, 2016 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2016/01/12/program-release-party-for-goto-amsterdam-on-january-21/)

On Thursday, January 21 the GOTO Amsterdam Team hosts a free event to release the program of GOTO Amsterdam 2016.

The Amsterdam Program Committee has been working very intensively to release the schedule for this year sooner than for any other year. This new approach will be implemented for all of the GOTO conferences with the goal to have the program ready half a year before a conference takes place.

This way our participants have enough time to register early and profit from the early bird rates that we offer. This is the most honest and best way to meet our customers. Read the rest of this entry »

GO AND BREAK RECORDS!

December 9th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/12/09/go-and-break-records/)

8 days, 7 hours, 39 minutes and 30 seconds!

Go and break records copy

In crossing the Atlantic, I learned a few things that I would like to share with you. First of all, I can tell you that the ocean is really big, with plenty of space for everyone. If you believe that the world is overpopulated and you want to be alone for a while, the ocean is a good place to go. In eight days, we only saw five other ships or sailboats and only for 5-10 minutes at a time. We saw a few dolphins and were attacked by a lot of flying fish. And yes, being slapped by a flying fish is an unpleasant surprise.

Being together with 14 other guys was actually easier than you would expect. They are really great guys, and the long discussions about life and other business during our recovery time were really great.

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Booting your Microservices Architecture with Spring and Netflix: the aftermath

November 26th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/11/26/booting-your-microservices-architecture-with-spring-and-netflix-the-aftermatch/)

On 25 November Trifork hosted a webinar in which I gave a short overview of Spring Cloud and its support for the Netflix OSS stack, focusing on Spring Cloud Config and the support for Netflix’s Eureka, Ribbon and Hystrix.

We’ve been investigating this stack over the last couple of months and are using parts of it in production already: we have found that a lot of the common concerns that you need to tackle as you’re moving into a distributed systems architecture are nicely covered and, in many cases, even abstracted by the Spring Cloud platform. In a typical Spring fashion, this allows you as an application developer to focus more on your business logic while letting the framework handle the concerns related to things like accessing shared configuration, working with service registries, handling failing downstream services, etc.

This blog provides you with background info to accompany the webinar, which has been recorded and can be found on our YouTube channel.
The code has been published on GitHub, as well as the accompanying config repository, in case you’d like to code along with the video.

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Controlling Java with the Leap Motion

November 17th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/11/17/controlling-java-with-the-leap-motion/)

Leap Motion Controller

The Leap Motion Controller is a device that uses two cameras to track the hands and fingers. This makes it possible to use gestures for controlling the computer or applications. It is possible to buy or download applications through the Leap Motion app store, but there is also an SDK for different languages available to integrate the controller in your own application.

With this article I aim to give an insight in the usability of the Leap Motion Controller in combination with Java. For this I describe the controller and Java API itself and have written an example application which uses the controller. The application is written in Java and is available on github.

Functionality of the controller

The basic functionality for the controller and API is working without problems. This makes it possible to make the interaction with devices and computers more intuitive. In the next screenshot an example is shown from the supplied Visualizer application with the detected hands and fingers.
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City-wide crowd management in Amsterdam

November 10th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/11/10/city-wide-crowd-management-in-amsterdam/)

As most residents and visitors of Amsterdam know, every year more people are visiting Amsterdam, city wide events like GayPride, Koningsdag and MuseumNacht are getting bigger and more frequent, putting more strain on the city’s infrastructure and all people living in the city center.

That’s why this November 7th, Amsterdam Marketing organized the Museumn8 hackathon to allow developers to come up with creative and innovative solutions for improving improving mobility, navigation and crowd management in the city. Twenty teams eventually participated.

Trifork (Rienk Prinsen, Marleine van Kampen, Marijn van Zelst) and weCity (David Kat, Luc Deliance) teamed up and joined the hackathon to give their take on solving this problem. Their solution:

city-live-logo

By transforming the advertisement billboards of JCDecaux into large information screens displaying real-time information, visitors can get informed about activities and interesting places in the vicinity of the billboard. They receive live crowd information, travel times to and queue lengths at museums and even recommendations where to go next. Read the rest of this entry »

Recognizing commercials using the Alphonso API

September 21st, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/09/21/recognizing-commercials-using-the-alphonso-api-2/)

Liberty Global organized the Hack & Play Appathon in Ziggo dome on September 15th and 16th. More than 20 teams of hackers, designers and programmers were invited to create an app or a game for the Liberty Global product Horizon set-top box. Team Trifork joined with Dennis de Goede (Design & Frontend), Tony Abidi (Devops) and myself (Front & Backend).

Alphonso added another challenge to the appathon: Create the best integration with the Alphonso platform. Integration challenge? Sounds like a Trifork challenge to me.

FirstPrice

 

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Large organizations are just not set up to be agile

September 21st, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/09/21/large-organizations-are-just-not-set-up-to-be-agile/)

There is something going wrong in the organization I am currently part of an onsite project, yet I can’t get my head around the specifics.

This very large governmental organization is growing agile initiatives all over the IT department. Development teams are having fun talking to their customers and are trying to create the best solutions to the needs of their stakeholders, yet everything agile about Agile halts when a shippable increment is ready to begin its journey through the rest of the organization.

A few weeks back I received an email from the team that is tasked with the becoming agile of our organization, asking me to fill out a form so I could show how SCRUM we were. I know it was meant to let us see for ourselves how agile we were, but to me it felt as if we were proving our agility through a checklist.

I know I checked every box there was, so according to the person sending it we were 100% Scrum. I just knew we weren’t agile, so there must be a flaw in checking of the Scrum checklist to see if you are agile.

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A wrinkle in time

June 30th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/06/30/a-wrinkle-in-time/)

Leap second

I clearly remember the morning of Sunday July 1, 2012, almost three years ago. I was at church, actually, when I got a call from one of our clients: “The website doesn’t seem to be working.” All I could check at that point was that, indeed, the website was not responding. So I called our sysadmin, who found that even SSH-ing into the machine running the site was taking much longer than usual. Finally, restarting everything solved the problem, but we were still unsure about what had happened.

As we found out later, it was related to the leap second, a phenomenon I had not even heard of until then. Read the rest of this entry »

Axon from the trenches: how to keep your code compatible with legacy events and Sagas

June 8th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/06/08/axon-from-the-trenches-how-to-keep-your-code-compatible-with-legacy-events-and-sagas/)

Imagine you’re using Axon to run an event sourcing application. Your production event store might contain millions of events, created in various versions of the application. Wouldn’t it be nice to know for sure that the latest version of your application plays nicely with all your production events and Sagas, including those from previous versions? Well, you can check for that, and it is fairly easy. Read the rest of this entry »