Trifork Blog

Category ‘Spring’

Service Discovery using Consul & Spring Cloud

December 14th, 2016 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2016/12/14/service-discovery-using-consul-and-spring-cloud/)

Introduction

In one of our customer projects we are heavily using Spring Boot in combination with other Spring projects for our microservices.

One of the more complex parts of microservices, especially when you are using them as fine-grained as meant to be, will be the fact that you need to setup and maintain the connections between all those services. In Spring you are typically doing this using some way of externalized configuration like property files. But even then, it can become quite a challenge when you need to connect with for instance 20 other microservices.

To make it even more complex you definitely want, especially in cloud based solutions, something like scalability. Actually, this should be accomplished by running just another instance of your microservice. They are self-contained, so they just need some basic configuration like setting the port-number. But then you also need something to load-balance the different microservices serving the same purpose. And to be honest: I don’t care about the location and port! I just want a service which offers me a certain contract. And at runtime, when needed, I want them to behave differently depending on configuration.

So what we are actually looking for is a solution which provides an easy way to do service discovery and even better, can act as a load-balancer and even better, can provide my services with their configuration.

This is where Consul.io comes to the rescue. According to their website Consul is a solution which makes service discovery and service configuration easy and is distributed, highly available and datacenter-aware.

So let’s discover how Consul plays nicely with Spring Boot!

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Writing less code

November 23rd, 2016 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2016/11/23/writing-less-code/)

Have you had that feeling that you have to write too much code to build simple functionality? Some things just feel repetitive, they feel you should be not have to write them yourself, instead a framework should make your life easier.

Recently I’ve been building a project in Java/Spring, and after some time I started wondering about alternatives and how to build the same functionality with less code.

There is lots of alternative frameworks and multiple ways of building rest endpoints in Java/Spring.

  • Building the controller/service/dao layers manually in Spring ; https://spring.io/guides/tutorials/bookmarks/
  • Using spring-data-rest to export your spring-data repositories ; https://spring.io/guides/gs/accessing-data-rest/
  • Groovy/grails RestfulController ; https://examples.javacodegeeks.com/jvm-languages/groovy/grails/grails-rest-example/
  • Python/django django-rest-framework ; http://www.django-rest-framework.org/tutorial/6-viewsets-and-routers/
  • etc

Examples

Below some abbreviated examples of how a simple rest endpoint looks for each approach. To actually run the examples, you’ll need check out the tutorials mentioned earlier. My goal here is a quick comparison of how you do things in each framework.

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Using Spring Session for concurrent session control in a clustered environment

April 8th, 2016 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2016/04/08/spring-session-concurrent-session-control/)

For a long time, Spring Security has provided support to limit the number of sessions a single user can have concurrently. This prevents users from being logged in from many different devices at the same time, for example to ensure that they won’t share their credentials to a paid site with their friends and family.

My former colleague Quinten Krijger has blogged about this feature beforeNote the last paragraph, which explains how this support is limited to single-node applications.

Although running on a single node may suffice for many applications, there are plenty applications running in a clustered environment that should be able to benefit from concurrent session control as well. As hinted in the aforementioned blog, this requires both implementing a custom SessionRegistry as well as ensuring that expiring a session is propagated to all nodes in the cluster.

This is exactly what I’ve done recently using Spring Session, a framework that allows you to take control over managing sessions using a shared external registry like Redis. In this post I’d like to walk you through the code, which can be found here: https://github.com/jkuipers/spring-session-concurrent-session-control

UPDATE:

Based on the code I wrote for this blog I’ve opened a pull request for Spring Session. That request is scheduled for inclusion in Spring Session 1.3, but the code works just fine with the upcoming 1.2 release and removes the limitation of not providing an expiry notification after exceeding the maximum number of sessions.

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GOTO Nights Amsterdam, Join & Learn!

March 8th, 2016 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2016/03/08/goto-nights-amsterdam-join-learn/)

As an introduction to the GOTO Conference in June, we organize a monthly meetup to introduce you to the topics of the conference. These meetups are called GOTO Nights and are totally free to attend and food and drinks are included.

At the start of the GOTO season we gather together to decide which topics are interesting for developers to learn more about. For these topics we try to find the best speakers for the conference and for the GOTO Nights.

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Spring-AMQP and payload validation: some notes from the trenches

February 29th, 2016 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2016/02/29/spring-amqp-payload-validation/)

It’s been a while since I’ve written one of our from-the-trenches blogs: that’s mostly because I’ve been very busy in those trenches developing systems for our customers.

This week I completed a Spring Boot-based microservice which is responsible for interacting with some 3rd party SOAP service: its own clients communicate with it by sending request message over RabbitMQ, and the service then sends back a response to a response queue after handling the SOAP response message.

Of course I used Spring-AMQP to build this service. Spring-AMQP supports a nice annotation-based listener programming model, based on Spring’s generic Message support.
That allows writing listener methods like this:

@RabbitListener(queues = REQUEST_QUEUE) 
public DeclarationResponse submitDeclaration(DeclarationRequest request) { 
  // handle the request and return a response 
}

The request parameter here is the result of converting the incoming AMQP message using a Spring-AMQP MessageConverter, after which it is considered to be the payload of the message (even when headers are used in the conversion as well).

The request messages that the clients send have some required fields: without those fields, the service can’t make the SOAP calls. While reading the RabbitListener JavaDoc I noticed that Spring-AMQP allows you to apply validation to message payload parameters by annotating it. When using this, you also have to add the @Payload annotation (which is optional without validation if your method doesn’t have any other arguments), so the result looks like this:

@RabbitListener(queues = REQUEST_QUEUE)
public DeclarationResponse submitDeclaration(@Valid @Payload DeclarationRequest request) { … }

By the way, Spring’s own @Validated (even as a meta-annotation) and in fact every annotation whose name starts with “Valid” are supported for this purpose as well.

Now we can add some JSR-303 Bean Validation annotations to the fields in our DeclarationRequest, like @NotNull, to express our validation constraints.

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Booting your Microservices Architecture with Spring and Netflix: the aftermath

November 26th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/11/26/booting-your-microservices-architecture-with-spring-and-netflix-the-aftermatch/)

On 25 November Trifork hosted a webinar in which I gave a short overview of Spring Cloud and its support for the Netflix OSS stack, focusing on Spring Cloud Config and the support for Netflix’s Eureka, Ribbon and Hystrix.

We’ve been investigating this stack over the last couple of months and are using parts of it in production already: we have found that a lot of the common concerns that you need to tackle as you’re moving into a distributed systems architecture are nicely covered and, in many cases, even abstracted by the Spring Cloud platform. In a typical Spring fashion, this allows you as an application developer to focus more on your business logic while letting the framework handle the concerns related to things like accessing shared configuration, working with service registries, handling failing downstream services, etc.

This blog provides you with background info to accompany the webinar, which has been recorded and can be found on our YouTube channel.
The code has been published on GitHub, as well as the accompanying config repository, in case you’d like to code along with the video.

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City-wide crowd management in Amsterdam

November 10th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/11/10/city-wide-crowd-management-in-amsterdam/)

As most residents and visitors of Amsterdam know, every year more people are visiting Amsterdam, city wide events like GayPride, Koningsdag and MuseumNacht are getting bigger and more frequent, putting more strain on the city’s infrastructure and all people living in the city center.

That’s why this November 7th, Amsterdam Marketing organized the Museumn8 hackathon to allow developers to come up with creative and innovative solutions for improving improving mobility, navigation and crowd management in the city. Twenty teams eventually participated.

Trifork (Rienk Prinsen, Marleine van Kampen, Marijn van Zelst) and weCity (David Kat, Luc Deliance) teamed up and joined the hackathon to give their take on solving this problem. Their solution:

city-live-logo

By transforming the advertisement billboards of JCDecaux into large information screens displaying real-time information, visitors can get informed about activities and interesting places in the vicinity of the billboard. They receive live crowd information, travel times to and queue lengths at museums and even recommendations where to go next. Read the rest of this entry »

Documenting your REST APIs

May 8th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/05/08/documenting-your-rest-apis/)

Whenever you deliver some API that is to be consumed by another party, you will get the inevitable question of providing documentation. Probably every developer’s least favorite task.

In Java there is javadoc, but that doesn’t cut it if you are delivering a Web Service API. In that realm we already know WSDL for SOAP based Web Services. Then again, every developer seems to prefer REST based Web Services these days and those are not WSDL based… So what then? That is a question with multiple answers. In the last few years there have been three different open-source projects that have tried to give an answer to this: swagger, RAML and API BluePrint. Of those Swagger has been around the longest and arguably gained the largest following.

Based on the completely subjective criteria ‘it needs to support Java’, ‘what about Spring MVC?’ and ‘can you deliver it to the customer by Monday?’ I decided to take a stab at documenting an existing API using Swagger. It is written in something that can run on a JVM, has Spring MVC support (via third party libraries) and seemed to be the easiest to set up based on their examples and various other online resources.

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Trifork NewsBite Feb 2015

February 9th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/02/09/trifork-newsbite-feb-2015/)

 

Trifork news bit 2

Dear Reader,

It’s been an exciting start to 2015. We have several news items that we would like to share with you. Our new launch of our new global website and we have plenty of meetup activities and GOTO nights planned for the agenda that you don’t want to miss. We are thrilled to announce the new Docker training’s are now available through our Trifork GOTO academy .We are creating momentum in the education market with our Brightcenter proposition and an introduction to our Eindhoven team who are actively involved in driving successful client engagements supporting our core customer needs in the the Southern part of Holland. Read on to learn more about all of this!

EMPOWERING OUR CUSTOMERS

We are delighted to reveal our newly designed website for The Trifork Group, feel free to Take a Peek!

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Active cache eviction with Ehcache and Spring Framework

February 9th, 2015 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2015/02/09/active-cache-eviction-with-ehcache-and-spring-framework/)

Caching is an essential to the majority of web applications. Let’s face it: most of the work done in an average web application (especially public ones) is repetitive, either the same user requesting the same information multiple times, or multiple users requesting the same information. The question is always: “How long do I cache”?

We just finished building the new website for a well-known Dutch newspaper. The old website had a 15 minute TTL cache and we knew that wasn’t going to cut it in the new website. Visitors want to see new articles and updates to articles the minute they’re published, not 15 minutes later. Therefore, we developed a scalable caching mechanism with active, fine-grained cache invalidation using just EhCache along with Java and Spring concepts you’re probably already familiar with. The solution we developed works in a distributed environment without the need for expensive distributed cache solutions.

In this blog post I’ll describe how we did it.

The setup

Our website shows lists of articles. Only the title and a summary are shown. Clicking on the article will retrieve and display the full article. Articles can contain pictures. The first picture is used as the headline picture, and is shown with the article summary in article lists. Read the rest of this entry »