Trifork Blog

Axon Framework, DDD, Microservices

Posts Tagged ‘Architecture’

Axon Framework 2.0 Released!

January 22nd, 2013 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2013/01/22/axon-framework-2-0-released/)

After laying the ground work for this release about a year ago, we now proudly announce the next major release of Axon Framework! The 2.0 release is a big step forward compared to the previous version, as it contains a thorough restructuring of components, making it even easier to build scalable and extensible applications.
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CQRS – Designing domain events

January 27th, 2010 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2010/01/27/cqrs-designing-domain-events/)

logo Command-Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) is slowly but steadily gaining ground as an architecture that helps developers to develop scalable, extensible and maintainable applications. Events play a major role in this architecture, and the way you design these events greatly influence the extensibility of your application.

In this post, I describe some CQRS event basics and design considerations that help keep your application extensible.

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Rethinking architecture with CQRS

December 21st, 2009 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2009/12/21/rethinking-architecture-with-cqrs/)

question_and_answer Many applications use some form of persistent storage to store its state. However, important information about this state is lost: why is the state as it currently is. Furthermore, a single model is used to store information that is retrieved for many different purposes, often resulting in extremely complex and bog-slow SQL queries.

Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) is an architectural style that makes a clear distinction between commands that change the application state and queries that expose the application state.

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Battling complexity in large web applications

October 20th, 2009 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2009/10/20/battling-complexity-in-large-web-applications/)

space-shuttle-endeavour-launch-2 Nowadays, companies are hardly ever satisfied with a mere web-presence. No, websites have become true applications in their own right. Instead of being a by-product, most businesses acknowledge that the web offers them a nice channel to do business. However, the demands from the business keeps growing as each company want to be better than its competitors.

The increasing demands from the business have a direct influence on the applications complexity. Each time, especially when joining external projects, I am amazed by the way complexity is dealt with in most applications. “Building software isn’t rocket science”, but sometimes we do seem to make it just as complex.

In this article, I provide some insight in different forms of complexity, and how software development teams can design their application in order to deal with the ever growing demands from the business.

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The misunderstanding of Domain Driven Design

May 10th, 2009 by
(http://blog.trifork.com/2009/05/10/the-misunderstanding-of-domain-driven-design/)

There seem to be two mainstream approaches in Java application development: the domain driven approach, and the “fat service layer” or Transaction Script approach. As an architect, I’ve been investigating both methodologies by reading about both of them and applying them in real life enterprise projects. It is at the least amusing to see how followers of each approach think of the other. An example of how developers (disappointing to realize that these people are co-developers) react on each other’s approach can be seen in the reactions to Arjen Poutsma’s post.

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